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What Do/did Molochans Think Of The Pentecostal Movement

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I was reading a bit about the Azusa Street Revival which happened for several years around 1906. During this time, people came from around the world to Los Angeles seeking to be baptized with the Holy Spirit. One of the teachings of the movement was that a believer in Christ could be baptized with the Holy Spirit, subsequent to salvation, and speak in tongues. There were also interpretations of tongues, prophecies, healings, and other gifts recorded. The Azusa Street meetings were characterized by mutual participation with participants speaking as they sensed the Spirit moving them.

 

Some Molokan Russians attended, I read. And there has been speculation that there may have been Molokan influence.

 

Depending on whose version of history you read, the Azusa Street Revival has been labeled the birthplace of the Pentecostal movement and various denominations trace their roots to it. Other Pentecostal churches trace their roots to a related movement in Topeka Kansas or various revivals in the Southeast about the same time. Aspects of Pentecostal theology and practice were accepted by certain churches within 'mainline denominations' in the 1960's during the Charismatic movement.

 

What was the reaction of the Molokan movement toward Pentecostalism then? What about now?

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I'd make a differentiation between molokans pre 1900 and the cult of molokanism in the 21st Century

 

That is not to say molokanism pre 1900 we completely Biblio-centric in their doctrine but, if anything, were closer to the tenets of Christianity as compared to todays cult of molokanism

 

The notion of the "birth of Pentecostalism" I believe, to some degree, is a misnomer

 

The gifts of the Spirit were not "born" in 1906...those gifts are/were available, by virtue of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, to those who know Jesus as Lord and Savior as allowed by Him.

 

Your statement "One of the teachings of the movement was that a believer in Christ could be baptized with the Holy Spirit, subsequent to salvation, and speak in tongues." seems to contradict itself

 

You cannot be a True believer in Jesus Christ and not have Salvation, nor can you manifest gifts of the Spirit of God without His Spirit indwelling

 

The "gifts" can be emulated and are certainly are of a spirit, but not of God for the non-Christian

 

As to the cult of molokanism in it's current form, the "gifts" seem to be at best a show

 

They are not exercised as God prescribes in His Word so their validity is doubtful from a Biblical standpoint

 

In addition, the cult of molokanism has fallen into the "new israel" gnostic camp of cults akin to jehovahs witnesses or mormonism

 

Complete with extra "interpretive" books that run wholly contrary to the Bible

 

The cult of molokanism seems to be suffering from "clanging cymbal" syndrome

 

1 ¶ Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal.

2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.

3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profits me nothing.

(1 Corinthains 1:13:1-3)

 

Their "love" does not extend to anyone outside the cult

 

If you are not "one of them" you would not be welcomed to join and participate in a cult service

 

It's tantamount to racism veiled in psuedo-spritual terms

 

 

I was reading a bit about the Azusa Street Revival which happened for several years around 1906. During this time, people came from around the world to Los Angeles seeking to be baptized with the Holy Spirit. One of the teachings of the movement was that a believer in Christ could be baptized with the Holy Spirit, subsequent to salvation, and speak in tongues. There were also interpretations of tongues, prophecies, healings, and other gifts recorded. The Azusa Street meetings were characterized by mutual participation with participants speaking as they sensed the Spirit moving them.

 

Some Molokan Russians attended, I read. And there has been speculation that there may have been Molokan influence.

 

Depending on whose version of history you read, the Azusa Street Revival has been labeled the birthplace of the Pentecostal movement and various denominations trace their roots to it. Other Pentecostal churches trace their roots to a related movement in Topeka Kansas or various revivals in the Southeast about the same time. Aspects of Pentecostal theology and practice were accepted by certain churches within 'mainline denominations' in the 1960's during the Charismatic movement.

 

What was the reaction of the Molokan movement toward Pentecostalism then? What about now?

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In response to the last message,

Your statement "One of the teachings of the movement was that a believer in Christ could be baptized with the Holy Spirit, subsequent to salvation, and speak in tongues." seems to contradict itself

 

You cannot be a True believer in Jesus Christ and not have Salvation, nor can you manifest gifts of the Spirit of God without His Spirit indwelling

 

Most Pentecostals are Trinitarian. A Pentecostal pastor or theologian might say that all Christians have the indwelling Spirit in some measure, but that the baptism of the Holy Spirit involves not just having the Spirit but being filled with the Spirit. Of course, answers will vary depending on who you ask about such things. Paul did write to believers to be filled with the Spirit, indicating that it wasn't necessarily automatic.

 

There are groups of Pentecostals who are Oneness, who say that Jesus is the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, who believe if you are saved you will speak in tongues. Those are the minority, and that belief sprung up after the Azusa Street revival had died down.

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Thank you for the clarification

 

Molokans would, to some degree, identify with the Pentecostal Movement

 

Molokans, in a large part, ARE NOT Trinitarians because Jesus is not considered Deity (Isaiah 9:6, John 1:1, 1:14) hence the cult moniker

 

What's emphasized today in the cult of molokanism today is the ceremony & traditions all with an eye toward an extra biblical book called the "spirit and Life" which is neither spirit nor life from a Christian standpoint.

 

The alleged manifestation of the "holy spirit" is based on audio cues as opposed to an actual moving of God's Spirit

 

How can it be of God's Spirit if they deny the Source?

 

That's not to say there's not a Christian remnant within the cult, but they are Spiritually malnourished because the Bible is not taught

 

They rest are "playing church"

 

 

This was from another post of mine

 

The Baptism of the Holy Spirit is different than water baptism

 

Begin by looking at 3 Greek prepositions: "para" (with), "en" (in), and "epi" (upon) as they relate to the work of the Holy Spirit

 

The Holy Spirit is with (para) the non-Christian doing the work of convicting them of sin, and drawing them into a relationship with Jesus

 

He abides with (para) you, and will be in (en) you. (See John 14:17)

 

Once we have received Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, the Holy Spirit moves in (en)

 

Or do you not know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and you are not your own? 1 Corinthians 6:19

 

Also see

 

21 Now He who establishes us with you in Christ and has anointed us is God,

22 who also has sealed us and given us the Spirit in our hearts as a guarantee. (2 Corinthians 1:21-22 NKJV)

 

Now to epi which from the Greek means upon. The Baptism of the Holy Spirit is that "epi" experience when the Holy Spirit will descend upon the Christian (See Acts 2)

 

 

 

 

In response to the last message,

Your statement "One of the teachings of the movement was that a believer in Christ could be baptized with the Holy Spirit, subsequent to salvation, and speak in tongues." seems to contradict itself

 

You cannot be a True believer in Jesus Christ and not have Salvation, nor can you manifest gifts of the Spirit of God without His Spirit indwelling

 

Most Pentecostals are Trinitarian. A Pentecostal pastor or theologian might say that all Christians have the indwelling Spirit in some measure, but that the baptism of the Holy Spirit involves not just having the Spirit but being filled with the Spirit. Of course, answers will vary depending on who you ask about such things. Paul did write to believers to be filled with the Spirit, indicating that it wasn't necessarily automatic.

 

There are groups of Pentecostals who are Oneness, who say that Jesus is the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, who believe if you are saved you will speak in tongues. Those are the minority, and that belief sprung up after the Azusa Street revival had died down.

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